Q1. What are the programmes offered by Engineering Faculties at MMU?
Q2. Are MMU Engineering degrees accredited?
Q3. Can students complete their Engineering degree in fewer than 4 years?
Q4. Are there any part-time undergraduate engineering degree programmes at MMU?
Q5. Are there any 2+2 credit-transfer arrangements with overseas universities?
Q6. What are the job or career prospects of the engineering majors?
Q7. What is the maximum number of subjects per trimester a student can take?
Q8. What are the common subjects among the nine Electronics majors?
Q9. Can I change major?
Q10. Can I change campus?
Q11. How much is the whole programme?
Q12. Is there any financial assistance or scholarship?
Q13: Can MMU graduates do postgraduate studies overseas?
Q14: Can MMU Engineering graduates practice overseas?
Q15: What are the differences between electrical engineering and electronics engineering?
Q16: What is the prospect for electronics engineering students majoring in Bio-Instrumentation?
Q17: What is the prospect for optical engineering or photonics students?
Q18: Can a student with color blindness apply for EE or ME course?
Q19: What is the mode of class instruction delivery?
Q20: Who are the instructors? What are their qualifications?
Q21: What are the entry requirements?
Q22: What are the lab facilities available to FOE students?
Q23: What about housing or accommodation? Does MMU furnish its students with in-house accommodation?
Q24: What are the job sectors for MMU's Engineering graduates?
Q25: What is the employment rate of FOE MMU graduates?



Q1. What are the programmes offered by Engineering Faculties at MMU?

Cyberjaya has 5 programmes and Melaka has 4 programmes; 1 programme is common to both campus. There are 8 different engineering undergraduate programmes in total:
No. Course Location Duration
1 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics Cyberjaya 4 years
2 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics majoring in Computer Cyberjaya 4 years
3 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics majoring in Telecommunications Cyberjaya / Melaka 4 years
4 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics majoring in Nanotechnology Cyberjaya 4 years
5 B.Eng. (Hons) Electrical Cyberjaya 4 years
6 B.Eng. (Hons) Mechanical Melaka 4 years
7 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics majoring in Robotics & Automation Melaka 4 years
8 B.Eng. (Hons) Electronics majoring in Bio-Instrumentation Melaka 4 years


There are 7 postgraduate programmes at various locations:
No. Course Location Mode of study
1 M.Eng. in Telecommunications Cyberjaya/PSDC by course work
2 M.Eng. in Microelectronics PSDC by course work
3 M.Eng. in Photonics PSDC by course work
4 M.Eng in Embedded System Melaka by course work
5 M.Eng in Advanced Manufacturing Management Melaka by course work
6 M.EngSc Melaka/Cyberjaya by research
7 Ph.D Melaka/Cyberjaya by research
Note: PSDC - Penang Skills Development Center, Penang



Q2. Are MMU Engineering degrees accredited?

Yes. Refer to Offical Document of Approval—by MQA (Malaysian Qualifications Agency), Institute of Engineers Malaysia (IEM), and Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM). MQA and BEM are government bodies and IEM is a professional body. In October 2000, MQA, BEM, and IEM form the Engineering Accreditation Council (EAC) as a one-stop centre for Engineering degree accreditation in Malaysia. All Courses conducted in MMU have been approved by EAC and LAN.
Major factors that determine accreditation include:
  1. Syllabus (120 credit hours: 80 engineering and 40 supporting)
  2. Teaching staff (At least a Master for lecturers, at least 2nd Class Upper Bachelor degree for tutors in MMU. In FOE, for example, we have 80% tutors with 1st class and 35% lecturers with PhD. FET has similar statistics.)
  3. Teaching facilities (Inter alia, modern lecture complexes, multimedia presentation, and state-of-art equipment. Satellite education programme is available; lectures can therefore be conducted via satellite—an implementation of tele-education; the tele-education project is funded by the Japanese and Malaysian government.)
  4. Supporting units and services (Student affairs, admission process—only students with good SPM results are admitted, record—using IT to help us in timetable scheduling, exam scheduling, results keeping, online registration, online results, online lecture notes, and tutorials.)
  5. Student development (we have courses, such as technical communications, basic laws, and cyberpreneurship, student activities through Engineering Society, IEE Student Chapter, and IEM Student Chapter.)



Q3. Can students complete their Engineering degree in fewer than 4 years?

Not any more. In May 2000, the Ministry of Education ruled that all Engineering courses in Malaysia must be of 4-year duration. This rule applies to students entering the Beta engineering in May 2000 and thereafter. All Engineering programmes in MMU take 4 years post-STPM and 5 years post-SPM.



Q4. Are there any part-time undergraduate engineering degree programmes at MMU?

No, there aren’t.



Q5. Are there any 2+2 credit-transfer arrangements with overseas universities?

Not really. Center For Quality Assurance And Enhancement (CQAE) has the list of universities collaborating with MMU for student exchange. However, the collaborations are general; no specific agreement, such as 2+2 credit-transfer arrangements, or any of such similar arrangements, are made.



Q6. What are the job or career prospects of the engineering majors?

In the following, the fields that require graduates from each major are shown:
  1. Electronics: consumable electronics, semiconductor, robotics, RF electronics for telecommunication
  2. Telecommunication: radio communication, mobile phone network planning, frequency planning
  3. Computer: computer system and information technology, data networking and communication
  4. Microwave and Communications: mobile phone and network, wireless, remote sensing, satellite
  5. Multimedia: Internet service provider, content developer, multimedia software and hardware provider
  6. Electrical: power generation, transmission, distribution, design and consultation, renewable energy
  7. Mechanical: automobile, renewable energy, factory automation, air-conditioning, consultancy
  8. Bioinstrumentation: health, biomedical and biotechnology industries, academic research
  9. Optical: Telecommunication, visual industry, academic research, photonics industry.
  10. Nanotechnology: Nanoelectronics, Academic or Industrial Research and Development
  11. Robotic and Automation: Robotics, Industrial Automation, academic research

The above list is far from exhaustive. Note that the demand of engineers is expected to be higher than supply, and varied; hence, EE graduates will often find themselves working in various fields that are not directly related to or clearly their major. Even if fresh graduates find a job in the field of their major (example: TE students working as telecommunication engineer, EE students working in semiconductor factories), there is still a high percentage that these engineers will switch fields (but still in the general discipline of E&E) in 5 to 10 years’ time. Therefore, it is important to have a broad fundamental in undergraduate programmes.



Q7. What is the maximum number of subjects per trimester a student can take?

FOE and FET will only offer a finite number of subjects per trimester, typically 5 to 6 engineering subjects. Students can take up to the maximum of 18 credit hours during the long trimester, and 9 during the short trimester. Students may take other subjects (offered by other faculties) but these subjects will not be counted towards the 139-credit requirement to earn an Engineering degree from MMU.



Q8. What are the common subjects among the nine Electronics majors?

Humanities: 24 credits (8 subjects)
Project & Training: 13 credits (8 for projects)
Common subjects: 66 credits (22 subjects)
Majors: 36 credits (12 subjects)
The majors will be different among the 5 programmes. However, Telecommunication and Microwave differ by only 6 subjects (18 credits). Computer and Electronics differ by 8 subjects (24 credits) and if both streams of students choose the same elective, the difference becomes only 6 subjects (18 credits).



Q9. Can I change major?

Yes, provided you remain in the same campus. For EE programmes, the Beta year is common for B.Eng (Hons) Electronics, Electronics majoring in Telecommunication, Electronics majoring in Computer, and Electronics majoring in Microwave, Electronics majoring in Optical, Electronics majoring in Nanotechnology. For Electronics majoring in Multimedia, there will be 1 different subject during the 3rd trimester of Beta year: Introduction to Multimedia.

However, it is more difficult to change to more popular courses such as into TE, or to change from Mechanical to EE major (in Melaka).



Q10. Can I change campus?

Yes, but changing campus is allowed with valid medical reason and up to the Dean’s discretion. We need to ensure the number of students at both campuses is fairly distributed so that laboratories equipment is adequate to run the academic programmes.



Q11. How much is the whole programme?

The fees for local students is RM60,000, spanning normally over 4 years.

For students starting June 2010 intake, they must register at least 3 subjects in the long trimester and at least 1 subject in the short trimester unless prohibited by academic status or course structure. Refund policy only applies to students that register for 4 subjects and above. They may drop the subject(s) before the closing date for add and drop period. A student will be charged for 3 subjects even if the student is taking less than three subjects. The conditions for refund are as follows:
  • between week 1 and 2 = 100% refund;
  • week 3 = 75% refund;
  • week 4-5  = 50 % refund;
  • week 6 and above = 0% refund.

This is applicable for the nominal years plus 1 year (i.e. 3+1 years for non-professional programmes and 4+1 years for professional programmes commencing with the BETA year)

If students stay beyond this minimum period (i.e. after the plus one year), they will be fined an ‘overstay charge’. Overstay charge is one fixed fee for long semester and one fixed fee for short semester. Overstay fixed fee is a separate fee from subjects registered (both retake and new subjects).

For International:
The fees is 20% higher than local students.
(For undergraduate engineering courses, the students need to acquire 139 credit hours, spanning normally over 4 years.)



Q12. Is there any financial assistance or scholarship?

Yes. Some companies offer scholarships worth RM10–20k/year. However, these awards are very competitive. MMU students may approach the Scholarship Unit to obtain the details of the scholarships. Also, most scholarships are binding.

Majority of MMU students get PTPTN (Perbadanan Tabung Pendidikan Tinggi Negara, National Higher Education Fund) loan. Annual loan for Science (including Engineering students) students may be up to RM16.5k. Students should pay back with some minimal annual interest rate over 10–20 years or so after graduation and commencement of work. Please refer to Admission and Bursary division for more information.



Q13: Can MMU graduates do postgraduate studies overseas?

Yes. We already have and have had MMU graduates doing their postgraduates in overseas universities, such as in UK, USA, Australia, Japan, and Germany.



Q14: Can MMU Engineering graduates practice overseas?

In each country, there is a professional engineering body that decides whether it wants to accept foreign engineers or not. Examples of the professional bodies are, in

Country Professional Body
Malaysia The Institution of Engineers, Malaysia (IEM),
USA Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
Canada Canadian Council of Professional Engineers (CCPE)
South Africa Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA)
UK Engineering Council of the United Kingdom (EC)
Hong Kong Hong Kong Institution of Engineers (HKIE)
Australia Institution of Engineers, Australia (IEAust)
New Zealand: Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ)
Ireland: Institution of Engineers of Ireland (IEI)


The Malaysian Engineering Accreditation Council has recently been accepted as a probationary signatory of the Washington Accord, which is a forum where signatory members recognize each other's engineers to realize the global mobility of engineers. So far USA, UK, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, and Ireland are signatories in the Washington Accord, while Germany, Malaysia, Japan, and Singapore are probationary signatories.



Q15: What are the differences between electrical engineering and electronics engineering?

Electrical engineering deals with heavy current and high voltage circuits, control, machines, communications, power systems, power electronics, math, and computer technology related courses. Electrical engineering is an engineering discipline that deals with the study and application of electricity and electromagnetism. Its practitioners are called electrical engineers. Electrical engineering is a broad field that encompasses many subfields. Electrical engineering has many subfields dealing with the various aspects of electromagnetism. Some work directly with Maxwell's equations to manipulate RF signals, some with power, and some with signal manipulation. (Power engineering deals not only with electricity generation, electric power transmission, and electricity distribution but also with electrical circuits and materials (e.g. insulators, semiconductors) that need to withstand high voltages and currents.)

Electronics engineering deals with light current and low voltage circuits, control, communications, integrated circuit, signal processing, math and basic courses on power system, power electronics, machines, and computer technology related courses. Electronics engineers design and test electrical networks (more commonly known as circuits) that take advantage of electromagnetic properties of electrical components or discrete/elements (such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors, diodes, semiconductors) to achieve the desired functionality. One of several ubiquitous examples is the tuner circuit, which allows the user of a radio to filter out all but a single station, corresponding to a desired signal frequency (such as those in AM and FM radios).



Q16: What is the prospect for electronics engineering students majoring in Bio-Instrumentation?

Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) Electronics majoring in Bioinstrumentation graduates can work in the following areas or places: health, biomedical and biotechnology industries, academic research, business, and management. The specific areas of employment include design of medical instrumentation and prostheses; development of biotechnology laboratory automation and data acquisition; development, manufacture, and testing of biotechnology and medical instrumentation; and management of technology in the hospital system. (*Bioinstrumentation engineering deals with accurate measurement of bioelectrical properties. Measuring an electrical circuit inevitably changes the voltages and currents in it. The objective is to minimize the influence of the measuring circuit or even compensate for it. The field also includes biosensors that use a material's electrical properties, or bioelectromechanical means of measurement. Examples of the former are piezoelectricity for measuring pressure and temperature-dependent resistors for measuring temperature.).



Q17: What is the prospect for optical engineering or photonics students?

Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) Electronics majoring in Optical graduates can work in the following areas or places: telecommunications, visual industry, photonics industry, academic research, business, and management. (*Optical engineering is the field of study which focuses on applications of optics. Optical engineers design optical instruments such as microscopes, telescope and equipment that utilizes the properties of light, such as optical sensors and metrological apparatus. Optical engineering metrology utilizes the latter to measure micro-vibrations with instruments like the laser speckle interferometer or to measure the properties of the various masses with instruments measuring refraction. **Photonics is the science and technology of generating and controlling light, and, in particular, using light to carry information. The name is derived from the fundamental information carrier—the photon. The science and applications of photonics are usually based on laser light. The science of photonics includes the emission, transmission, amplification, detection, modulation, and switching of light. List of photonic devices includes lasers, LEDs, fiber optics, and photonic crystals. Applications of photonics range from light detection to communications and information processing. Photonics as a science is closely related to quantum optics with a somewhat unclear boundary: fundamental research tends to be called quantum optics, and photonics is rather application related research (especially such trying to establish electronics with photons instead of electrons—hence, the name).



Q18: Can a student with color blindness apply for EE or ME course?

Generally, not recommended—depending on the degree of the student’s colorblindness. For example, color-rich VLSI-related task might render color-blind people speechless.



Q19: What is the mode of class instruction delivery?

Besides traditional classroom instructions, MMU instructors use multimedia technology. Furthermore, updated and exhaustive lecture notes, schedules, announcements, tutorials, exercises, reading materials, and references are available online to the students’ benefit, convenience, and success. In addition, students go through hands-on experiments using interactive computer-based training concepts. Collaborative work between industries and the MMU faculty is also prevalent. In short, state-of-the-art facilities and their utilization, and strategic industry-university relation support and enhance the teaching quality at MMU.



Q20: Who are the instructors? What are their qualifications?

All teaching staff members at MMU posses a least a Master (for lecturers) or at least a 2nd Class Upper Bachelor degree(for tutors). In FOE, for example, more than 35% of the lecturers are PhD holders and 80% of the tutors are 1st class degree holders; FET has similar figures.



Q21: What are the entry requirements?

In general, Alpha students need at least five SPM credits or equivalent qualifications; and Beta students, at least two STPM principals or equivalent qualifications. In addition, Alpha engineering students need to have at least SPM credits in English, Additional Mathematics, Modern Mathematics, and Physics— and Beta engineering students need to have at least STPM principals in Mathematics and Physics

For the MUET entry requirement, MMU’s policy on the MUET entry requirement is Band 1. Student must achieve Band 3 as the exit requirement (before graduation) for MMU students.



Q22: What are the lab facilities available to FOE students?

FOE has more than 20 modern well-equipped teaching laboratories. The labs are used for engineering experiments and student projects. Research labs are also opened to students participating in various research projects undertaken by the faculty. Some of the FOE teaching labs are:
  1. Wave Radiation Lab - research related to wave radiation and electromagnetic waves.
  2. Nanotechnology Lab - teaching and R&D related to nanotechnology and nano-electronics.
  3. Optical Labs 1 & 2 - undergraduate lab experiments in the field of optical engineering.
  4. Project Labs 1, 2 & 3 - experiments related to final year projects.
  5. Intel Multi-Core Processing Lab - research and teaching related to microprocessor multicore technology and parallel processing training/curriculum.
  6. Microprocessor Lab - experiments related to advanced microprocessors and microcontrollers.
  7. Multimedia Computing Lab - general computing needs and lab experiments that require the use of MATLAB, ERACS and various other multimedia software.
  8. Panasonic Lab - experiments related to VLSI design, computer networking and architecture simulation.
  9. Control and Automation Lab - experiments related to industrial electronics, robotics and instrumentation systems. Also supports experiments related to microelectronics, digital logic design and field theory.
  10. Machine and Drive Lab - experiments in energy conversion, machines, drives and other power related subjects.
  11. Energy System Lab - experiments related to power and energy systems.
  12. Embedded System & DSP Lab - teaching and R&D related to embedded systems and digital signal processing.
  13. Electronics Labs 1 & 2 - experiments related to analog and digital electronic systems.
  14. Intel Advanced Architecture Lab - general computing needs and experiments related to computer architecture.
  15. Multimedia Design Lab - general computing needs and work related to development of multimedia software.
  16. PCB Workshop – to fabricate printed circuit boards (PCB) for their projects.
  17. Telecommunications Lab - experiments in the field of telecommunication that includes fixed line communication, mobile communication and satellite communication.
  18. Applied Electromagnetic Lab - experiments and research related to antenna, propagation, radar and microwave devices.
  19. Intel Microelectronics Lab - IC design and RF courses, as well as for research in the area of integrated circuit design, RF, and network processor.
  20. Alcatel Lab, Nokia Lab, and NTT Research Lab - R&D work.



Q23: What about housing or accommodation? Does MMU furnish its students with in-house accommodation?

There are many on-campus and off-campus houses or apartments here—some are within 10-minute strolling distance. Yes, MMU does provide on-campus housing, but the number is limited. Allocation of on-campus accommodation is subject to availability at the time of application— and students who are successful in obtaining one will be allocated up to a maximum of one-year on-campus accommodation. Students who would like to apply for on-campus accommodation must contact directly the Hostel Unit of Student Affairs & Sports Division.



Q24: What are the job sectors for MMU's Engineering graduates?




Q25: What is the employment rate of FOE MMU graduates?